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Articles tagged by information sharing

FINRA Hits Deutsche Over Squawk Boxes The US Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has fined Deutsche Bank  $12.5 million for “significant supervisory failures related to research and trading-related information it disseminated to its employees…over internal speakers commonly known as squawk boxes”. FINRA says that despite “multiple ...
The Impact of the FX Global Code: Good, but More to Do The Global Foreign Exchange Committee (GFXC) has issued a paper on the results of a survey it conducted with the intention of measuring the baseline level of awareness and adoption of the FX Global Code by market participants. The survey was undertaken at the end of September 2017 and sent to more than 500 FX market participants globally, including firms not involved in the creation of the Code. The survey was conducted with the objective of gathering a diverse set of views from firms representing different jurisdictions, sectors, sizes and levels of activity in the FX market.
FMSB Seeks Feedback on Information Sharing Guidance The FICC Markets Standards Board (FMSB) has published a Transparency Draft of a new Statement of Good Practice on Information and Confidentiality for fixed income and commodities markets. The FMSB says the proposed guidance is not intended to apply to the FX markets, which is covered by the FX Global Code, or to the precious metals markets, which is covered by the Precious Metals Code, rather it seeks to build on those works for the fixed income and commodities markets.
ASIC “Disappointed” in Lack of Progress in NAB FX Reform The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) has expressed disappointment at the failure of National Australia Bank to fully implement a reform programme linked to an Enforceable Undertaking (EU) levied by ASIC after deficiencies were found in the bank's wholesale spot FX business. NAB, along with the other major Australian banks, were fined by ASIC in December 2016 for a series of failures in their FX businesses, including attempts at front running orders, manipulating fixes and inappropriately sharing confidential information.
And Another Thing... There was an interesting line in a report in yesterday’s Handelsblatt discussing the impending lawsuit against the banks in Europe and the US. We, along with other news organisations, reported the impending European lawsuit at the time the US papers were filed (although it did apparently come as a surprise to some outlets who reported the European case “exclusively” one week later!) but the Handelsblatt report has a quote from a source at one of the plaintiffs that I found quite insightful and potentially signals a nightmare for the banks facing the case.
And Finally... With a reminder to readers that there is still time to vote for a real Irrational – P&L’s Socks of the Year (click here), let’s move onto to the next accolade, the “It’s been a tough year for…” award. The winner might come as a surprise because I, along with many, feel the FX Global Code has made decent progress this past year and has also done a lot of good for the market by providing a clear framework within which people can work.
New York Fed Publishes Policy on Confidential Market Information The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has taken the step of publishing a statement detailing how it handles confidential information from foreign exchange and Treasury market participants. The New York Fed says it is committed to the use and handling of confidential information about participants in financial markets “in a manner that promotes the integrity and efficiency of these markets, and is consistent with goals of the Treasury Market Practices Group (TMPG) Best Practices and the FX Global Code”.
BoE, ESMA Prepare for Brexit No-Deal with MoU The Bank of England and European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) have announced that they have agreed Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) regarding cooperation and information-sharing arrangements with respect to central counterparties (CCPs) and central securities depositories (CSDs). The MoUs follow the adoption by the European Commission in December 2018 of temporary equivalence decisions on the future UK legal and supervisory framework for UK CCPs and CSDs. The Commission’s implementing acts would come into effect in the result of a no-deal Brexit. In that scenario, they would allow UK CCPs and CSDs to be recognised by ESMA from 30 March 2019, and therefore continue to provide services respectively to EU clearing members, trading venues and also provide notary and settlement services for securities issued under EU law. The MoUs will also only take effect in the event of a no-deal Brexit.