Tag: Virtual Currencies

Virtual Currencies

CFTC Issues Final Guidance on Delivery for Digital Assets

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) today announced the commission voted unanimously to approve final interpretive guidance concerning retail commodity transactions involving certain digital assets. Specifically, the guidance clarifies the CFTC’s views regarding the “actual delivery” exception to Section 2(c)(2)(D) of the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) in the context of digital assets that serve as […]

Exploring the Grey Areas of Crypto Regulation

From a regulatory perspective, one of the challenges around operating in the crypto markets is that different regulators appear to define cryptoassets in different ways.

For example, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has defined digital currencies as commodities, while the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) seems to think that at least some of them might be securities.

Speaking at Profit & Loss Forex Network New York, Mike Gill, chief of staff to US CFTC chairman, Christopher Giancarlo, and the CFTC’s COO, discussed some of the challenges facing regulators when it comes to defining these products.

One Cryptocurrency to Rule Them All?

Other cryptocurrencies will continue to catch up with bitcoin this year, but this is by no means a bad thing for this nascent industry, says Galen Stops.

“Whether it works out or not, the bitcoin story definitely has further to go. And regardless of its success or failure, it seems increasingly likely that virtual currency, in one form or another, is here to stay” – “Does Bitcoin Have a Future?” (Profit & Loss, December 2013).

A lot has changed in the intervening years since Profit & Loss published the above statement in conclusion to its first ever feature length article on bitcoin.

Bitcoin: That’s the Thing That Goes Up, Right?

Not so much a price prediction, more a market structure view, but Colin Lambert believes the nature of trading in Bitcoin will change in 2018.

If you ever wanted to know the financial markets’ equivalent of playing Russian Roulette, look no further than attempts to predict the price of bitcoin going forward.

There were not many who saw a decline in bitcoin at the start of last year, but even though there was a consensus that it was going up (and why wouldn’t it when you have a limited supply trying to meeting increased demand driven by publicity?), no one remotely nailed the year-end of $16,000. the highest estimate of the price this time last year was probably around $2,000 – and even during the third quarter of the year when it rose past $4,500 no one was thinking a further quadrupling.

South Korea Cryptocurrency Ban Talk Sends Bitcoin, Ethereum Tumbling

The price of bitcoin has dropped significantly following new reports that authorities in South Korea might ban the trading of cryptocurrency exchanges.

As mainstream news outlets started reporting on comments made by the South Korean Minister of Justice, Park Sang-Ki, that a bill is being prepared to ban the trading of cryptocurrencies, the price of bitcoin fell from $14,932 at 12:04am BST on January 11 to $12,884 by 4:20am BST, according to data from CoinDesk.

At the time of writing, 5:55pm BST, the price has recovered to $13,746, which is still a 7.5% decline in the overall value compared to this earlier high.