Tag: regulations

regulations

And Another Thing…

As we reported at the start of this week, Citi formally confirmed what most of us knew, that it was cutting the number of connections to its FX business. I see this as the start of a process, however – nowhere near the end – one that also reflects what is likely to be a […]

Report: Regulation to Drive FX Options Towards Exchanges

A new report from Greenwich Associates argues that the incoming Uncleared Margin Rules (UMR) will fundamentally change the economics of OTC FX options trading to a point where buy side firms will increasingly trade these products on listed exchanges. “Historically, most FX options trading was done over the counter, but UMR has the potential to […]

In the FICC of it – Surprise Optimism Regarding FXPB

So we’ve just published our Q3 edition of Profit & Loss magazine, which includes our prime services special report, and I wanted to share some thoughts about one segment of it.

When I first started the report I was very negative on the prospects for FX prime brokers, over the eighteen months or so I’d heard so many complaints about credit constraints, about offboarding – I don’t think that was even a phrase that I’d heard prior to SNB – and the general retrenchment of FXPBs.

Now obviously SNB was a catalyst for a lot of these issues, but really it just exacerbated a trend that already existed and this was caused by the introduction of new regulations that made it more expensive for banks to offer FXPB services to a lot of clients.

Buy Side Calls for Swaps Trading Innovation

Representatives of buy side firms called for greater innovation and flexibility around swaps execution at the SefCon VII event in New York on January 18, hosted by the Wholesale Markets Brokers’ Association, Americas, and organised by Profit & Loss.

Speakers at the event explained that swaps trading has not changed much for the buy side since the introduction of Swap Execution Facilities (SEFs), with most buy side firms executing their swaps transactions via a request for quote (RFQ) format. The only difference now, they said, is that the RFQ occurs on an electronic platform rather than via the phone.