Tag: Mifid Ii

Mifid Ii

And Another Thing…

I read this week that UBS’ compliance head Markus Ronner believes that while they will inevitably remain high, compliance costs for the banking industry have peaked. There are undoubtedly a host of financial markets’ participants out there who fervently hope he is right, actually if it comes down to it, I hope he’s right! The […]

Cappitech Rolls Out RTS 28 Intelligence Tool

Cappitech has announced the launch of RTS 28 Market Intelligence, a product that the firm claims allows financial institutions to use regulatory compliance data to their own advantage by assessing firms’ best execution capabilities across all asset classes and benchmarks performance to the industry average. The new product enables asset managers to optimise performance by […]

EVIA Provides Feedback to EU on MiFIR

The European Venues and Intermediaries Association (EVIA), formerly known as the Wholesale Markets’ Brokers Association (WMBA), has published its response to a call from Germany’s Finance Ministry for feedback on MiFID II and MiFIR one year on from their implementation. In the feedback, EVIA makes a number of points and stresses its belief that foreign exchange swaps should not be covered under the regulation. EVIA does note that whilst its feedback sets out some of the difficulties and remedies in response to the premise of the call for evidence, it states that MiFID2 delivered a “great many benefits”.

Currenex and FX Connect: An Aggressive Roadmap

2018 “began with a bang” for Currenex and FX Connect due to the implementation of MiFID II, according to David Newns, global head of Global Link Execution Services at State Street, which owns both platforms. He adds that a “not inconsiderable amount of blood, sweat and tears” went into ensuring that the two Multilateral Trading Facilities (MTFs) that it was required to launch were up and running ahead of the January 3 deadline, an experience that was shared by many market participants in Europe last year.

Currenex and FX Connect: An Aggressive Roadmap

2018 “began with a bang” for Currenex and FX Connect due to the implementation of MiFID II, according to David Newns, global head of Global Link Execution Services at State Street, which owns both platforms. He adds that a “not inconsiderable amount of blood, sweat and tears” went into ensuring that the two Multilateral Trading Facilities (MTFs) that it was required to launch were up and running ahead of the January 3 deadline, an experience that was shared by many market participants in Europe last year.

Bloomberg: Handling a Sea of Change

“The biggest driver for the industry last year was regulation. It created a sea of change in the way that markets actually behave,” says Tod Van Name, global head of FX electronic trading at Bloomberg. MiFID II was obviously the major piece of regulation driving this change in 2018, but although this regulation only applied to firms operating in Europe, Van Name says it caused a much broader push globally to raise market transparency, track trade details, and justify all of the decisions made around trade execution. While it represented a big lift for many multi-dealer platforms, this was especially acute for a firm like Bloomberg, which offers such a wide array of securities and instruments that trade across many asset classes and to a diverse range of client types.

Bloomberg: Handling a Sea of Change

“The biggest driver for the industry last year was regulation. It created a sea of change in the way that markets actually behave,” says Tod Van Name, global head of FX electronic trading at Bloomberg. MiFID II was obviously the major piece of regulation driving this change in 2018, but although this regulation only applied to firms operating in Europe, Van Name says it caused a much broader push globally to raise market transparency, track trade details, and justify all of the decisions made around trade execution. While it represented a big lift for many multi-dealer platforms, this was especially acute for a firm like Bloomberg, which offers such a wide array of securities and instruments that trade across many asset classes and to a diverse range of client types.

Has FX Turned a Corner?

Now that MiFID II is in force and the industry has had time to digest the Global Code of Conduct, platform providers will face less distractions in 2019, says Galen Stops.In the second half of 2017 it seemed as though many FX market participants, on both the buy and sell sides, were forced to shelve any business plans that they might have as resources were diverted to help ensure compliance with MiFID II ahead of the deadline on January 3, 2018. Preparations for MiFID II cost an estimated $2.1bn in 2017 alone, according to a report by Expand, a Boston Consulting Group company, and IHS Markit, and this does not account for the amount of manpower and time that was also devoted to ensuring that everything was ready within these firms ahead of the deadline.

Has FX Turned a Corner?

Now that MiFID II is in force and the industry has had time to digest the Global Code of Conduct, platform providers will face less distractions in 2019, says Galen Stops.In the second half of 2017 it seemed as though many FX market participants, on both the buy and sell sides, were forced to shelve any business plans that they might have as resources were diverted to help ensure compliance with MiFID II ahead of the deadline on January 3, 2018. Preparations for MiFID II cost an estimated $2.1bn in 2017 alone, according to a report by Expand, a Boston Consulting Group company, and IHS Markit, and this does not account for the amount of manpower and time that was also devoted to ensuring that everything was ready within these firms ahead of the deadline.

In the FICC of It

In this week’s podcast Colin Lambert and Galen Stops discuss the article penned for Profit & Loss by former FX trader Rohan Ramchandani about his trial and subsequent acquittal for market manipulation. While they generally agree on most points there is, inevitably, areas of disagreement, but that is nothing compared to when they move on (thanks to a quiet news week) to how they ranked each other’s predictions for 2018. The results are available on the website, but why did Stops given Lambert a 6/10 for a bitcoin prediction that was actually correct? And why did Lambert return the compliment given Stops just a 4/10 for his own crypto prediction? All will be revealed in this week’s In the FICC of It podcast, along with exactly which one of them scored the most points with their predictions.