Tag: Manipulation

Manipulation

And Another Thing…

In what can only be described as a plea for sanity, this very brief column has only one message – get over it people! In an absolute shocker (yes, that is sarcasm), a group of banks are being sued in the UK over FX manipulation and the use of chat rooms. This seems to have […]

Trader Walks Free in Euribor Trial

Former Deutsche Bank trader and managing director Andreas Hauschild has been acquitted of conspiracy to defraud at London’s Southwark Crown Court over the rigging of the Euro Interbank Offered Rate (Euribor) after being found not guilty of manipulating the benchmark rate during global financial crisis. The case was brought by the UK”s Serious Fraud Office […]

EU Fines Five Banks for FX Manipulation

The European Union has formally fined five banks a total of EUR 1.07 billion for taking part in what the EU terms two “cartels” in the spot FX market, involving trades in 11 currencies. Two settlement decisions have been announced, the first involves a group called the “Three Way Banana Split” which sees a total […]

And Finally…

So we brace ourselves, as an industry, for more bad headlines about conduct in the FX markets, however in contrast to previous instances, the industry should be ready on this occasion. The culmination of the European Union’s clearly exhaustive and complicated investigation into events that first came to light six years ago is upon us […]

Former Barclays Trader Guilty of Euribor Manipulation

A jury at a London court has found former Barclays interest rate trader Carlo Palombo, guilty of manipulating the Euribor benchmark interbank lending rate, however it found a fellow former Barclays trader not guilty and is still considering its verdict in a third related case.
The UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO) brought the case, alleging that Palombo, Sisse Bohart, who was acquitted, and Colin Bermingham, who is awaiting a verdict, colluded with former Deutsche Bank counterparts Christian Bittar and Phillipe Moryoussef to fix the benchmark rate set. The methodology alleged by the SFO was very familiar to anyone following these cases – the dealers allegedly pressured fellow workers who were charged with submitting the bank’s reference rate, to alter to suit the accused’s books.
Bittar and Moryoussef were convicted last year on the same charges, the latter was given an eight-year jail sentence, which Bittar, who pleaded guilty, was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment.

In the FICC of It

Scepticism abounds in this week’s In the FICC of It podcast as Colin Lambert and Galen Stops take a look at the latest bank to unveil a digital markets strategy – including all your favourite buzzwords. While Stops believes this is the latest move in what will be a growing trend, our podcasters also wonder whether it’s not really just a rebranding exercise?
They then move into more traditional areas and discuss JP Morgan’s survey on FX market conditions, and while they agree with a lot of the findings, there are one or two areas that raise an eyebrow, not least around internalisation and AI.
AI-generated trading and liquidity are also the forefront as they move on to share their thoughts around the flash crash in Jardine Matheson stock last week in Singapore, including asking the question, what does it mean for market maker programmes and certain order types?
The discussion then moves on to look at the latest FX turnover surveys from the world’s FX committees, with particular attention on three interesting/puzzling (delete as appropriate) elements of the UK report surrounding RMB, NDFs and voice brokers.
The podcast ends on with Lambert praising “the optimism of youth” after Stops highlights what he thinks could be a very important line at the end of the latest document detailing an FX-related fine in the US – in other words, the cynic in him won the day!

And Finally…

The problems around OTC market benchmarks are well-established, but it’s not just limited to these markets – there are suspicions and claims about collusion and attempted manipulation in listed markets as well. The latest lawsuit against FX banks has a very interesting paragraph in it which highlights the Plaintiffs’ belief that the Fix is open to manipulation, which begs the question, “Why use it?”
So is it time for a rational and genuine discussion about the use of these benchmarks? I think it is.

What to Make of the Cartel Acquittal?

Shortly after we published the news that Richard Usher, Rohan Ramchandani and Chris Ashton, the three members of the now notorious “Cartel” chat room, were found not guilty of FX market manipulation by a New York court last Friday, my phone started buzzing.

Lots of the activity was WhatsApp messages and phone calls from various industry sources wanting to chime in regarding the decision, and one thing that has been interesting in the intervening time is that my sources seem to be split about whether they’re surprised regarding the outcome of the case.

“I know that they only release choice bits of the chat room transcripts to the public, but what came out looked pretty damning to me. I’m surprised that they’ve been able to get out of this one,” opines one market source.

Cartel Members Acquitted of FX Market Manipulation

Richard Usher, Rohan Ramchandani and Chris Ashton, the three members of the now notorious “Cartel” chat room, have been found not guilty of FX market manipulation by a jury in New York.

It was alleged that between 2007 and 2013 Usher, Ramchandani and Ashton worked in coordination to fix prices and rig EUR/USD markets, participating in telephone calls and electronic messages, including near-daily conversations in a private electronic chat room, in order to achieve this. The indictment against them was issued in January of this year.

If found guilty the three could have each faced a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

And Another Thing…

I absolutely get the value in data – more importantly, I absolutely get the potential for data in our markets. However (and who didn’t know that was coming?) it should not become the only driver of analysis. This week’s research paper on the 4pm Benchmark Fix does a great job of empirically analysing the changes and their impact on the mechanism, but, to my mind, fails to take into account how the changes corrected an existing imbalance that needed redressing for the overall wellbeing of the market.