Tag: FX volatility

FX volatility

In the FICC of It

In this week’s podcast Colin Lambert comes out swinging from the start as Galen Stops reports on a sharp divide between panellists at Profit & Loss’ Copenhagen conference over the future of FX volatility. Typically Lambert gives short shrift to one side of the argument as he channels his inner Star Trek (of which he […]

In the FICC of It

There is much for listeners to enjoy in this week’s podcast as Colin Lambert tries to sound intelligent on credit, clearing and crypto, three subject with which he has the loosest connection. Luckily Galen Stops is on hand to provide the voice of reason as our two podcasters discuss how prime brokers and their preferred target customers are poles apart on what the PB service should look like. The potential for big change is there, says Stops, but what, if anything, is going to trigger it?
This week’s podcast also looks at a new ETF launched in the crypto space, which, Stops explains, seeks to provide investor access to “digital assets”. Putting aside Lambert’s inevitable cynicism – “is ‘digital assets’ just another phrase for cryptocurrencies?” – the development is an interesting one, for as he asks, ‘does this make the technology underpinning the crypto world the asset in question?’
Luckily for him and sadly for listeners, Lambert does get to sound off about how the FX market is radically different from even 15-20 years ago, and of course he has a theory about why that is. He also gets to re-live his childhood thanks to Stops asking him, “If you were trading now, what would you do with Cable?”

And Another Thing…

After a good January, March is shaping up to be, much like February, a pretty ropey month for many in the foreign exchange industry, and this is manifesting itself in the form an increasingly louder debate about the lack of volatility. I saw this week one publication suggesting that FX markets need “a proper crisis” to get things moving, but I am not even convinced that will do it. The sad reality for those seeking livelier markets is that this is probably your new ‘normal’.

And Finally…

There is a lot of press around discussing the struggles currency managers are having in making money in markets that ostensibly should be fertile ground. We have some real moves, event risk, interest rate divergence and a changing market structure – all of which would suggest there is an opportunity for everyone, but it’s not happening. One of the reasons for this is that different narratives are driving markets at different times – and that makes it hard for a single strategy to succeed.

And Finally…

Today is all about questions – the most pressing of which has to be, if Switzerland issues a digital currency, will it immediately put an offer in the market? Perhaps more pertinently, it is also about the impact of the lack of traders in the FX market, because if the first week of the year is anything to go by then cryptocurrencies will continue to steal the agenda – the traditional FX market just doesn’t seem as though it can be bothered.

And Another Thing…

The starting point for this column has to be the observation that, by and large, foreign exchange dealers do like a moan. Let’s face it, we’re a bunch of whingers and the events of the past week – thanks to flip-flopping central bankers – have only reinforced this trait. Are we, however, looking at things the wrong way? Markets undoubtedly adjust quicker to events than they used to, but is there an opportunity for traders in this? I happen to think there is.

FX Volatility: Creating a New Playbook

In recent years, the FX market has had to cope with some major spikes in volatility, forcing firms to adjust how they trade this market. The number of large market moves on the back of thin liquidity during unanticipated (and anticipated) market events seen last year – from SNB to Brexit to the US elections – raises the question whether there a need for a new “FX Playbook”.

Speaking at Profit & Loss Forex Network Chicago, Stephen Flanagan, executive director, global FX e-commerce risk manager at JP Morgan, highlighted how firms have made adjustments.

Expecting the Unexpected in FX

The now infamous “SNB Day” forced a number of FX market participants to re-assess some of their long-held assumptions and business practices.

As liquidity evaporated fresh concerns were raised about the lack of risk taking experience and appetite amongst some sell side institutions and the impact of technology on liquidity in stressed market conditions.

As some firms reportedly attempted to re-paper certain trades it also added fuel to the ongoing debate about whether or not the practice of last look still has a place in the modern FX market. This is debate that has continued to rage on, notably at a very lively debate at Profit & Loss’ Forex Network New York conference in May.