Tag: DLT

DLT

P&L Talk Series with Baton Systems’ Arjun Jayaram

Arjun Jayaram, CEO of Baton Systems, talks to Profit & Loss about how distributed ledger technology (DLT) is already helping the FX market, why the hype cycle around this technology is coming to an end and who he expects to win the “blockchain wars”. Profit & Loss: What is the problem in the FX market […]

The Problem with Cryptocurrencies….

One of the ongoing problems regarding the adoption of cryptocurrencies by mainstream financial firms was on full display at a fintech event hosted by the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) in New York this week. The problem was highlighted by a fairly innocuous sounding question from the moderator: what is the problem that cryptocurrencies […]

The Profit & Loss Innovation Award

P&L Report Card If there is one intangible benefit in firms allocating budget to the FX businesses it is that it allows people to think innovation once more. After years of throwing resources at seemingly ever-increasing regulatory demands, there is a sense that last year – and this – the shackles are finally off and […]

Elwood Offers a New Way to Invest in Digital Assets

Galen Stops takes a look at the new launch from Elwood Asset Management that is targeting institutional investors wanting exposure to digital assets – without holding cryptocurrencies.London-based Elwood Asset Management, which is backed by Brevan Howard co-founder, Alan Howard, has partnered with Invesco to launch its first product aimed at investors looking for exposure to digital assets, the Invesco Elwood Global Blockchain UCITS ETF.The central problem identified by staff at Elwood prior to this launch is that currently there is a distinct lack of ways for institutional investors to gain exposure to digital assets. Right now, these firms can either buy cryptocurrencies – such as bitcoin – or invest in a venture capital fund, both of which can be problematic for institutional investors given the liquidity and regulatory issues surrounding cryptocurrencies and the limitations dictated by firms’ investment mandates

ParFX: More of the Same

I n 2010 the FX Pure initiative was launched, which recognised that there were participants in the market that were getting a systematic advantage by using platforms that allowed them to get an advantage just by being fast. In addition, there were a number of other factors that formed an important part of the project; trading and pricing transparency and creating a trading platform with fairness and equality at its core. In 2013, the FX Pure initiative resulted in the launch of ParFX and now, almost 10 years on from the original inception of the idea, Roger Rutherford, the COO of ParFX, insists that the model and its underlying principles are as relevant today as it’s ever been.

ParFX: More of the Same

I n 2010 the FX Pure initiative was launched, which recognised that there were participants in the market that were getting a systematic advantage by using platforms that allowed them to get an advantage just by being fast. In addition, there were a number of other factors that formed an important part of the project; trading and pricing transparency and creating a trading platform with fairness and equality at its core. In 2013, the FX Pure initiative resulted in the launch of ParFX and now, almost 10 years on from the original inception of the idea, Roger Rutherford, the COO of ParFX, insists that the model and its underlying principles are as relevant today as it’s ever been.

Blockchain in FX: A Solution That’s Found a Problem?

Galen Stops takes a closer look at the distributed ledger technology solution that HSBC has deployed for settling FX transactions.One of the long-standing accusations levelled against distributed ledger technology (DLT) within financial services is that it is a solution looking for a problem, an accusation that appears to have gained some weight over the past few years given the vast disparity between the initial level of hype around this technology and the actual implemented use cases for it.Which is why it is significant that HSBC recently announced that it has settled more than three million FX transactions and made more than 150,000 payments worth $250 billion using DLT. If this announcement caught FX market participants by surprise, this is probably because this DLT solution, called HSBC FX Everywhere, has thus far only been used to orchestrate payments across HSBC’s internal balance sheets.

In the FICC of It

In football parlance it’s a tap in for Galen Stops and Colin Lambert in this week’s podcast as they have more academic-research-that-states-the-obvious to poke fun at. Listen in as they discuss last week’s report on the Swiss National Bank debacle in 2015 as well as the FX market’s handling of the Brexit vote. They also take a look at the potential impact of last week’s HSBC announcement that it had settled FX trades using distributed ledger technology, as well as the mysterious disappearance from marketing material of two asset classes at a recent platform media day.

Understanding Blockchain Forks

Most published analysis of the legal consequences of blockchain forks has been underwhelming. Discussions often centre around the legal risks to miners and developers, questions of little relevance because of the general absence of contracts between users of public blockchains and the constellation of jurisdictions from which they operate. In other words, it will freeze in hell before anonymous developers based god-knows-where win a lawsuit against unidentified Chinese miners aggregated in a mining pool. I should add that several articles appeared to be advertorials by law firms looking for new business.

HSBC Settles $250bn of FX Using Distributed Ledger Technology

HSBC has now settled more than three million FX transactions and made more than 150,000 payments worth $250 billion using distributed ledger technology (DLT), it announced today.The bank’s DLT solution, called HSBC FX Everywhere, has been used for the past year to orchestrate payments across HSBC’s internal balance sheets.HSBC highlights three key benefits of the solution. The first is that it provides a shared, single version of “the truth of intra-company trades”, from execution through to settlement, which reduces risk of discrepancy and delay. Secondly, it means that confirmation and settlement is automated by matching and netting transactions, which reduces costs and reliance on external settlement networks.