Month: January 2019

Central Banks Remain Cautious on Digital Currencies: BIS

A survey of central banks by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) finds that while a majority are collaboratively looking at the implications of issuing a central bank digital currency (CBDC), indeed many have reached the stage of considering practical issues, they are proceeding cautiously with few reporting plans to actually issue a digital currency in the short or medium term.
The survey had 63 respondents, which the BIS says represents around 80% of the world’s population, and asked about central banks’ current work on CBDCs, what motivates that work, and how likely their issuance of a CBDC is.

New York Fed Publishes Policy on Confidential Market Information

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has taken the step of publishing a statement detailing how it handles confidential information from foreign exchange and Treasury market participants.
The New York Fed says it is committed to the use and handling of confidential information about participants in financial markets “in a manner that promotes the integrity and efficiency of these markets, and is consistent with goals of the Treasury Market Practices Group (TMPG) Best Practices and the FX Global Code”.

LCH Touts First Cross-Currency Swap Compression

For the first time, trades registered in LCH’s SwapAgent service were successfully compressed in TriOptima’s multilateral USD/EUR cross-currency swap compression cycle. Using its triReduce compression service, €4.5 billion in notional of trades registered in SwapAgent were compressed. During the run, SwapAgent and non-SwapAgent trades were blended together to achieve better benefits from the compression.Compression is the process by which members can eliminate offsetting trades to reduce notional outstanding and the number of line items in a portfolio. Capital requirements such as those introduced under the Basel III leverage ratio have incentivised banks to reduce notional outstanding.

Platform Data Confirms Decent December

Data from a second group of platform providers has reinforced the message from the first two releases that while it didn’t pull up too many trees, December 2018 was a solid month for most that ended a good year. All providers reporting increased activity in the whole of 2018 compared to 2017. There was a more mixed message in the month-on-month data with only three providers reporting an increase from November, but the year-on-year data generally speaking gave grounds for optimism amongst providers.

And Finally…

Welcome to 2019 – may it be a happy and successful 12 months for you all.
The nice stuff out of the way, let’s revert to type – and talk about the prospects for destruction of the euro.
I have read quite a bit over the past two weeks about how the euro enters it’s 20th year on shaky ground and while I don’t actually agree with the analysis, or the fact that the euro may implode in the coming five years, one has to say there are issues bubbling away that may present challenges to the EU as it seeks to reach the drinking age in most US states in one piece.

TCA is dead….long live TCA…

“It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad.”—C. S. LewisTransaction cost analysis (TCA) as we know it has already begun to go bad. Its origins in FX were really to allow asset managers to show their clients that their FX executions were in the right ballpark, but the new breed of buy-side FX traders (many of whom have moved from the sell-side) are looking for much deeper insights, such as:

Cboe Announces Management Changes in Wake of Concannon Departure

Cboe Global Markets has announced a raft of senior management changes following the news that Chris Concannon is set to leave the firm, where he currently holds the position of president and COO.Chris Isaacson, currently executive vice president and chief information officer, will become executive vice president and COO, reporting to chairman and CEO, Ed Tilly. In addition, Eric Crampton, currently senior vice president and global head of software engineering, will become senior vice president and CTO, reporting to Isaacson. Tilly will add the title of president to his current role, a position he previously held from 2011 to 2013. These appointments will be effective January 14.

OTCXN Signs OSL as Crypto Liquidity Provider

OTCXN, a blockchain-powered capital markets infrastructure company, announced that OSL, an OTC digital asset brokerage company in Asia-Pacific, has joined its network as a liquidity provider. “We are extremely pleased to have OSL join our network as a core liquidity provider. Having a major market participant like OSL providing liquidity on our network is a testament to the strength of our core value proposition – eliminating trading counterparty and settlement risk. The presence of key market participants like OSL accelerates market adoption and expansion of the OTCXN network to reduce risks and efficiently scale crypto trading across the entire ecosystem. We look forward to working closely with OSL to serve our mutual clients,” says Rosario Ingargiola, CEO and founder of OTCXN.

In the FICC of it

In this week’s podcast Colin Lambert and Galen Stops tackle two big stories in the FX market: the recent flash crash in the Asia markets and the changes at Citi’s FX prime brokerage (FXPB) business.Both Lambert and Stops express skepticism that the news regarding Apple’s profits in China was the cause of the flash crash, although the former is equally unsure about an alternative theory put forward by the latter to explain the price moves. Both agree though that the event was symptomatic of changes in the nature of liquidity in the FX market, and note a disparity between what many market participants will say in private and in public on this matter.

FX Sees Flash Crash in Asia – But What Caused It?

FX markets in early Asia experienced what dealers refer to as a “mini flash crash” today as risk aversion levels were ramped up and volatility ensued following a profit warning from Apple.
USDJPY fell 400 points at one stage before reversing more than half of the drop, while AUDUSD also collapsed sharply to hit a new multi-year low. There were also sharp moves in other pairs, with Cable dropping more than 200 points and even EURUSD saw what is for the normally stable cross, a decent move.