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Profit & Loss Events

Profit & Loss Latin America 2017

February 9th 2017

Profit & Loss Latin America 2017

The St. Regis Mexico City

Mexico

COST:

Non-Exhibiting Vendor: USD$1995

US/Canada/Europe Delegate: USD$295
Free to attend for the buy-side and local bank attendees 

The definition of “Buy side” firms means end user clients (ie, investing institutions such as mutual funds, pension funds, insurance companies, hedge funds, CTAs, asset managers, and corporates). Buy side firms may have investors as clients, but have no trading clients. Technology, platform and service providers of any type, including broker-dealers and prime of primes that may be clients of other firms but have trading clients of their own, do not fall into the definition of “buy side” firms.

PROGRAMME:

9:00-10:00 Coffee & Registration

10:00-10:30 Keynote Address "Recent Developments in the Mexican Financial Markets" by Juan Garcia, Director of Domestic Operations, Banco de Mexico

10:30-11:30 Panel 1: Mexico’s Economy: Riding the Storm

As the value of the Mexican peso tumbled following the announcement of Donald Trump’s election victory, it was a clear indication that geopolitical events could have an outsized impact on the countries’ economy going forward. In 2017 Trump will be sworn into office, Brexit negotiations are due to begin in earnest, major elections are taking place in France and Germany and there could be potentially significant leadership changes in China. Amidst all these geopolitical changes, what factors are likely to have the biggest impact on the Mexican economy?

This panel will also discuss:

  • What does a Trump administration mean for traders in Mexico?
  • Will politics or central bank action be the bigger driver of market volatility?
  • How will slowing growth in China impact the Latin American region?
  • How will the Mexican peso perform in 2017?
  • What are the biggest challenges facing the next Banxico governor?

Moderator:

Alejandro Padilla Santana, Head of Strategy, FX and Fixed Income, Banorte

Speakers:

Marco Oviedo, Chief Economist for Mexico, Barclays
Alfredo Sordo, CIO, Santander Asset Management
Daniela Blancas, Financial Market Economist, CitiBanamex
Juan Carlos Alderete, FX Strategist, Banorte

11:30-12:00 Coffee Break

12:00-12:45 – Panel 2: Solving the Clearing Conundrum

Due to changes in Mexican financial regulations from November 15th onwards Mexican peso Interest rate swaps being traded by Mexican Financial Institutions are required to centrally clear. Three Clearing Houses presently offer this service. However, there are still numerous derivatives products that no clearing house has yet developed the capacity to receive. How are the unclearable derivatives handled? Is the imposition of obligatory mutual margins a temporary solution?

 This panel will also discuss:

  • What options are left to firms wanting to trade these derivatives products?
  • What are the technical challenges associated with moving these products into clearing houses?
  • Are clearing houses themselves fundamentally either too big to fail or to small to survive?
  • How are clearing houses organised to resist a major market event?

Speakers:

Jorge Gonzalez, Senior Financial Attorney, BBVA Bancomer

12:45-1:45 Lunch

1:45-2:10 Fireside Chat: The Future of Listed FX in Mexico

2:10-2:30 Strategy Talk: Opportunities and Pitfalls in EMFX Markets

Bob Savage, CEO, CCTrack

2:30-3:15 Coffee Break

3:15-3:45 – Panel 5: Technology Game Changers in FX

Although technology has driven FX market growth, the liquidity gaps that occurred after the SNB’s decision to drop its peg to the euro and during the sterling flash crash in October 2016 sparked debate about whether technology is unambiguously good for the industry. As Mexico’s market continues to move electronic, what lessons can be learnt from other markets?

This panel will also discuss:

  • What will be the big technology “game changers” in the next 2-5 years?
  • What are the biggest concerns associated with a largely electronic FX market?
  • What is the next stage of evolution for single-bank and multi-dealer trading platforms?
  • Should firms be looking for FX specific or cross-asset technology solutions?

Speakers:

Alan Schwarz, CEO, FX SpotStream 
Jack Linker, Head of Bank and Hedge Fund Sales, 360T Americas

3:45-4:15 Coffee Break

4:15-5:00 Panel 6: The Changing Liquidity Ecosystem

Many of the largest FX banks have pulled back from principal market making in favour of an agency business model due to increased overheads and compressed profit margins. How has this impacted liquidity and will other market making firms be able to capitalise on the gap in the market that has opened up?

This panel will also look at:

  • What role will non-bank market makers and HFTs play in Latin American FX market?
  • How is the relationship between regional and tier one banks evolving?
  • How is NDF liquidity changing?
  • Will more FX flows move back to local markets in Latin America?

Speakers:

Luis Martins, Global Head of FX – Managing Director, BBVA

5:00-7:00

Cocktail Reception - sponsored by Fenics

Forex Network London 2017

March 29th 2017

Forex Network London 2017

etc.venues 155 Bishopsgate

United Kingdom

COST:

Delegate: GBP£450
Non-Exhibiting Vendor: GBP£900
Free to attend for the buy-side

The definition of “Buy side” firms means end user clients (ie, investing institutions such as mutual funds, pension funds, insurance companies, hedge funds, CTAs, asset managers, and corporates). Buy side firms may have investors as clients, but have no trading clients. Technology, platform and service providers of any type, including broker-dealers, liquidity down-streamers and prime of primes that may be clients of other firms but have trading clients of their own, do not fall into the definition of “buy side” firms.

Forex Network Chicago 2017

September 27th 2017 to September 28th 2017

Forex Network Chicago 2017

The Westin Chicago River North

United States

COST:

Delegate: USD$1050
Non-Exhibiting Vendor: USD$2500
Free to attend for the buy-side

The definition of “Buy side” firms means end user clients (ie, investing institutions such as mutual funds, pension funds, insurance companies, hedge funds, CTAs, asset managers, and corporates). Buy side firms may have investors as clients, but have no trading clients. Technology, platform and service providers of any type, including broker-dealers and prime of primes that may be clients of other firms but have trading clients of their own, do not fall into the definition of “buy side” firms.